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What the iPad May Mean for Medicine

New technology has the potential to change the way we do things, from changing a single part of a routine to altering the game plan entirely. Many have lauded Apple’s new iPad as one of these revolutionary technologies, and one that has great potential to be used in fields like education, business and even medicine. Whether or not the iPad can truly revolutionize the way treatment is carried out at hospitals around the nation is yet to be seen, but there is a lot of buzz about it, and more and more facilities are willing to give it a try in their day-to-day practice. If you’re curious about what the iPad could mean for medicine, from nursing schools to nursing homes, take a look at these potential applications, articles and even apps to see what the iPad could change, make easier, and streamline for medical facilities.

Applications

There are a wide range of ways that the iPad has been suggested for use in the hospital setting. Here are just a few applications that can show you what the iPad could mean for changing the way you do patient care in your hospital.

  • Accessing patient records. The iPad makes it simple to bring up and page through all kinds of patient records, including photos, radiology images, and much more.
  • Writing prescriptions. For hospitals with digital prescription systems, or even ones without, writing and getting a prescription filled for a patient could easily work with the iPad at the touch of a button.
  • Looking at x-ray images. Radiological images are already available to view on the iPhone with the right apps, but with the iPad, doctors and nurses will be able to see the images in a much larger size, making them more useful to the professionals and patients alike.
  • Sharing information with patients. With its fairly large screen, the iPad makes it possible to easily show patients images and information related to their treatment. And a better informed patient is more likely to be at ease and happier with treatment.
  • Communicating with hospital staff. Keeping in touch with those you work with in different parts of the hospital or even in different medical facilities altogether is incredibly easy with the functionality provided by the iPad.
  • Quickly finding images and diagnoses for patients. Not sure what exactly a bump or rash means on your patient? The iPad makes it simple to look up medical reference information with high resolution photos so you can improve the accuracy of your diagnoses.
  • Looking up other medical cases. If you’ve got a particularly difficult case to crack, you might need to do a little research. The iPad, working with some great apps, can help you do the research you need, contact other specialists and find the right information for the best treatment.
  • Sharing and publishing medical research. With the iPad, you’ll be able to read the latest research being done and even share your own discoveries as you’re making them, keeping you in the loop and helping doctors all over the world deliver the best care.
  • Taking patient history. While pen and paper can work fine for getting a patient history, taking it on the iPad means it can be instantly accessible for other doctors and nurses in the hospital and that it can be retrieved and modified in an instant.
  • Managing patient care. The iPad can make it simple to manage almost every level of patient care. Taking patient history, finding a diagnosis, writing prescriptions, sending a referral, helping patients understand their conditions and much more can all be done from one simple, easy-to-use device.

http://www.nursingschools.net/blog/2010/08/what-the-ipad-may-mean-for-medicine/

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